Assistant Professor

Office: 218 Bryant Space Science Center
Phone: (352) 294-1879
Email: adamginsburg@ufl.edu
Homepage: www.adamgginsburg.com

Educational Background

  • Ph.D, Astrophysics, University of Colorado, 2013
  • M.S., Astrophysics, University of Colorado, 2009
  • B.S., Astrophysics, Rice University, 2007

Areas of Specialty

High-mass Star Formation, radio and millimeter astronomy, Molecular Interstellar Medium (ISM), Turbulence in the ISM, Astrochemistry, Astronomical Software Development

Research Interests

I study the formation of the most massive stars and how their formation process affects their neighbors, with the aim of understanding what physical processes control the stellar initial mass function. I use primarily radio and millimeter telescopes to measure the molecular interstellar medium, which is the gas phase from which stars form. Turbulence and chemistry are the two most important and least understood processes that affect both how the stars form and how we detect their birth environments, so my research includes these fields by necessity. I am also interested in the maintenance and development of new tools to facilitate observational astronomy and comparison between simulations and observations.

Biography

I began my career as an undergraduate at Rice University, with a B.S. in Astrophysics, in 2007. I did my PhD at the University of Colorado (2013), working with Prof. John Bally. I was a European Southern Observatory (ESO) fellow in Garching, Germany (postdoc; 2013-2016) then a Jansky fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico (postdoc; 2016-2019) before coming to UF.

Image of Paul Torrey

Assistant Professor

Office: 310 Bryant Space Science Center
Phone: (352) 294–1846
Fax: (352) 392–5089
Email: paul.torrey@ufl.edu

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Astronomy & Astrophysics, Harvard, 2014

Areas of Specialty

Galaxy formation and evolution, cosmological simulations of galaxy formation, numerical methods, high performance computing

Research Interests

My research focuses on understanding the role the feedback plays in shaping galaxy populations. We use very large cosmological simulations which include comprehensive galaxy formation physics models to both create realistic galaxy populations, and to further understand how and why such galaxy populations formed. Our group has played a central role in the Illustris and IllustrisTNG simulations, and continues to develop new and novel methods for modeling galaxy formation.

Biography

I received my B.S. from Cornell University in Applied Physics, and my Ph.D. in Astronomy & Astrophysics from Harvard University in 2014 under the supervision of Lars Hernquist. I did postdoctoral work at MIT, including a Hubble Fellowship, where I worked with Mark Vogelsberger, Rob Simcoe, and Phil Hopkins. I started as an assistant professor at University of Florida in 2018.

Picture of Charles Telesco

Professor

Office: 211E Bryant Space Science Center
Phone: (352) 294–1832
Fax: (352) 392–5089
Email: telesco@astro.ufl.edu
Homepage: astro.ufl.edu/~telesco

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Astronomy, University of Chicago, 1977

Areas of Specialty

Planet formation, planet evolution, protoplanetary disks, circumstellar disks, debris disks, star formation, infrared instrumentation

Research Interests

My research emphasizes the determination of the detailed structure of circumstellar disks around fairly young stars, those less than a few tens of millions of years old. Disks around stars younger than a million years old are likely still coalescing into planets, and determination of the disk structure provides constraints on the planet-forming environment, particularly the densities and temperatures of the coalescing solids and the shape of the disk. The tools that I use for this research are mid-infrared cameras many of which my team and I at the University of Florida have built. These include OSCIR, T-ReCS, and most recently CanariCam for the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias on La Palma in the Canary Islands, Spain. These instruments help fulfill my goal of building the tools that make my ideas come alive.

Biography

I am a Professor in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Florida. I received my PhD in Astronomy and Astrophysics in 1977 from the University of Chicago flying on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory under the guidance of my advisor Al Harper. After a short time at MIT, I went to the University of Hawaii in Manoa as a staff astronomer on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, which took me frequently and happily to Mauna Kea. Thereafter, I moved to NASA Ames Research Center, then to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. In 1995, after 12 years at NASA, I joined the faculty at the University of Florida, where I established the Astronomical Instrumentation Program.

Picture of Francisco Reyes

Lecturer | Associate Scientist | Director of UF Teaching Observatories

Office: 12 Bryant Space Science Center
Phone: (352) 294–1885
Fax: (352) 392–5089
Email: freyes@astro.ufl.edu
Homepage: astro.ufl.edu/~freyes/

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Astronomy, University of Florida, 1989
  • M.Sc., Astronomy, University of Florida, 1981
  • B.Sc., Electrical Engineering, University of Chile, 1977

Areas of Specialty

Low frequency and planetary radio astronomy, Jupiter decametric radio emission, pulsar low frequency emission and studies, radio astronomical instrumentation, computer control of telescopes, astronomical instrumentation

Research Interests

Low frequency planetary radio astronomy. Jupiter decametric radio emission. Micro structure of Jupiter’s S burts. Jovian radio rotational period. Location of jovian decametric radio sources. Observation and studies of pulsar at low radio frequencies. Participated in the construction and testing of Mid IR intruments TReCS and Canaricam. Observation of transiting extrasolar planet. Astronomical education.

Biography

Associate Scientist in the Astronomy Dept. of University of Florida; Director of the UF Teaching Observatories (Campus Teaching Observatory and Rosemary Hill Observatory); Director of the Univ. of Florida Radio Observatory; I got my PhD in 1989 and Master degree in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Thomas D. Carr; Degree of Electrical Engineer (Ingeniero Civil Electricista) from Univ. of Chile in 1977.


Assistant Professor | Undergraduate Coordinator

Office: 216 Bryant Space Science Center
Phone: (352) 294–1865
Fax: (352) 392–5089
Email: desika.narayanan@ufl.edu
Homepage: astro.ufl.edu/~desika.narayanan

Educational Background

  • Ph.D, Astrophysics, University of Arizona, 2007

Areas of Specialty

Theoretical Astrophysics, Cosmological Galaxy Formation, Physics of the Interstellar Medium, Star Formation, Large-Scale Star Formation

Research Interests

My research focuses on theoretical models primarily related to cosmological galaxy evolution, star formation, and the interstellar medium (ISM). I principally develop and utilize large scale numerical simulations to simulate the interplay between small scale star formation, ISM physics, and global galaxy evolution. This involves studying galaxies from the stand point of their star formation/ISM properties ranging from the Milky Way through galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization

Biography

I am currently an Assistant Professor in Astronomy at the University of Florida. I began my career as an undergraduate at UF, with a B.S. in Astronomy (highest honors), and B.S. in Physics (high honors) in 2003. I did my PhD at the University of Arizona (2007), working with Prof. Chris Walker. I did a CfA fellowship at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (postdoc; 2007-2010), and was the Bok Fellow at the University of Arizona (postdoc; 2010-2013). I was then an Assistant Professor at Haverford College (2014-2017) prior to arriving at UF.

Naibi Mariñas

Lecturer | Associate Scientist

Office: 223 Bryant Space Science Center
Phone: (352) 294–1859
Fax: (352) 392–5089
Email: marinas@astro.ufl.edu
Homepage: astro.ufl.edu/~marinas/

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Astronomy, University of Florida, 2007
  • B.Sc., Physics & Math, University of Florida, 1999

Areas of Specialty

Star formation, circumstellar disks, mid-infrared instrumentation, near-infrared and mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy.

Research Interests

My main area of research is star and planetary system formation. I used mid-infrared and near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy to study young stars and the dusty disks that surround them.

Biography

I was born in Havana, Cuba. Growing up my interests were split between literature and physics and I went to Havana University to study philology. In 1992, I came to the US with my family. After learning English, I came to UF to study physics and math and graduated in 1999. After a summer internship at the CFA, I decided to continue graduate studies in astronomy and obtained a PhD. from UF in May 2007.


Professor | Department Chair

Office: 220 Bryant Space Science Center
Phone: (352) 294–1862
Fax: (352) 392–5089
Email: elada@astro.ufl.edu
Homepage: astro.ufl.edu/~elada/

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Astronomy, University of Texas, 1990
  • B.Sc., Physics, Yale University, 1983

Areas of Specialty

Star Formation, Embedded Clusters, IMF, Molecular Clouds, Circumstellar Disks.

Research Interests

My research is focused on understanding the origin, properties, evolution and fate of young embedded clusters within molecular clouds.

Biography

I am currently a Professor in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Florida. I received my BS in Physics from Yale University in 1983 and my PhD in Astronomy from the University of Texas in 1990. I spent 3.5 years as a postdoctoral researcher at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and then 3 more years as a Hubble Fellow at the University of Maryland. I joined the faculty at the University of Florida in the fall of 1996. I received an NSF CAREER award in 1998 and a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 1999.